Oregon Nikkei History

Sharing and preserving Japanese American history and culture

On this site we highlight photos from our historical collection housed at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center in Portland's Old Town neighborhood, as well as other information about history and Japanese Americans in Oregon. Please visit www.oregonnikkei.org to learn more about the Oregon Nikkei Endowment and its programs.
Posts tagged "Japanese Americans"

Obon in Portland, Holladay Park, circa early 1950s. This photo was featured in the recently closed exhibit Capturing a Generation through the Eye of a Lens: The Photographs of Frank C. Hirahara, 1948-54 at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center. A native of Yakima Valley, Washington, Frank honed his skills as a young photographer and photo editor of the Heart Mountain High School Tempo Annual while incarcerated during World War II with his family at the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming.

ONLC 3008, gift of Patti Hirahara.

ourpresidents:

Today is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans Interned During WWII

On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 granting the War Department broad powers to create military exclusion areas. Although the order did not identify any particular group, in practice it was used almost exclusively to intern Americans of Japanese descent.

Although there were no reliable reports that Japanese-Americans on the United States West Coast presented a subversive threat, on March 2, 1942 the military declared California, Oregon and Washington State strategic areas from which Americans of Japanese decent were to be excluded.

More than 110,000 Japanese-Americans (64% of whom were American-born citizens) were required to abandon their homes and jobs and to live in 10 relocation camps.

The United States Supreme Court finally ruled that continued detention without cause was unconstitutional, and the military relocation order was rescinded in December 1944.

Images: 

Japanese Americans near trains during Relocation. Circa 1942.

Baggage check during Japanese Relocation. Circa 1942.

Exclusion order posted at First and Front Streets in San Francisco directing removal of persons of Japanese ancestry from the first section of the city to be affected by evacuation. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration., ca. 07/1942.

Photograph of Dust Storm at Manzanar War Relocation Authority Center, 07/03/1942.

-from the FDR Library

railways-and-roses:

Tule Lake Relocation Center near Newell, Calif., 1942 or 43. Women at the Japanese American relocation camps of World War II, photographer unknown. 

(via roses-and-railways)

Portrait of Seki Hiromura, the mother of the donor of this photo, and one of her sons. Seki and her husband Kikuo raised their five boys in Portland, Oregon. Circa 1925.

Portrait of Seki Hiromura, the mother of the donor of this photo, and one of her sons. Seki and her husband Kikuo raised their five boys in Portland, Oregon. Circa 1925.

The Hood River Nikkei community is shown gathered in front of the Japanese Community Hall in 1929, commemorating Japanese Ambassador Debuchi’s visit.

Shoichi Endow (right) in the U.S. Army with two other Nisei soldiers during World War II. Sho joined the army prior to Pearl Harbor and eventually ended up in the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This photo may have been taken in Camp Shelby, Mississippi, circa 1944.

The Mikado baseball team of Portland, Oregon, circa 1936. Players include George Somekawa, George Marumoto, John Murakami, George Azumano, Art Somekawa, Hood Shiogi, and Salem Yagawa.

January 1945, Menton, France. Soldiers from the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team determining coordinates for targeting mortars. Left to right: Okamoto, Lt. Teraoka, Akira “Ike” Iwasaki.

The Endow Family of Hood River, circa 1926. From left to right: Tei, Kane, Mitsue, Shoichi, Shohei.

Woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp in Idaho by Marian Hara of Portland, Oregon, an art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School.

Members of Hood Sadaji Shiogi’s family picking berries. The Shiogi family owned farmland in Montavilla, Oregon, and leased land in Troutdale, Oregon, around the time this photo was taken (circa 1915).

Pfc. Hideo Takahashi of “I” Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This photo was taken at Camp Roberts in California, sometime before Pearl Harbor. Hideo eventually went on to participate in the rescue of the Lost Battalion. Read more about Hideo Takahashi at Go for Broke.

Pfc. Hideo Takahashi of “I” Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This photo was taken at Camp Roberts in California, sometime before Pearl Harbor. Hideo eventually went on to participate in the rescue of the Lost Battalion. Read more about Hideo Takahashi at Go for Broke.

Teruo Tsuboi at the Tsuboi Bros. jewelry store, possibly repairing a pocket watch, circa 1920. The Tsuboi Bros. store was located in Portland’s Japantown on what is now NW 6th Avenue and Burnside Street.

Sahomi Tachibana performs on stage at the Topaz, Utah, internment camp in 1944.

Woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp by an art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School. The print shows a few of the boys in camp playing basketball near the barracks.