Oregon Nikkei History

Sharing and preserving Japanese American history and culture

On this site we highlight photos from our historical collection housed at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center in Portland's Old Town neighborhood, as well as other information about history and Japanese Americans in Oregon. Please visit www.oregonnikkei.org to learn more about the Oregon Nikkei Endowment and its programs.
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Posts tagged "Minidoka"

Woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp in Idaho by Marian Hara of Portland, Oregon, an art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School.

Woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp by an art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School. The print shows a few of the boys in camp playing basketball near the barracks.

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A Japanese family returning home (Seattle, Washington) from a relocation center camp in Hunt, Idaho on May 10, 1945

Woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp by Betty Jane Michikami, an art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School during World War II.

Minidoka Relocation Center residents, 1945

The residents of Block 37 in Minidoka in 1945. This photo donor’s mother is seated in the second row, and his father is standing in the third row. The donor speculates that this photo was taken near the closing of the Minidoka camp since there are so few people shown.

Woodblock print of Hunt, Idaho

A woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp by a Japanese American art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School during World War II. The artist here has depicted the barbed wire fence around the camp, something which is rarely seen in photographs.

Hunt Hi-Lites Vol. 2, No. 7

Page 2 of the January 7, 1944, issue of the Hunt Hi-Lites, the Hunt High School newspaper printed at the Minidoka Relocation Center, where many Japanese Americans from the Pacific Northwest spent much of World War II. This page contains a gossip column which, as the first issue of the new year, also mentions New Year’s resolutions. Here is the gossip column, printed in full:

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The beginning of the new year is the time when we make—and break resolutions. We create them on the first of the new year, but after that we find that everyone of our fixed proposals are all shot to pieces. This year, let’s all of us turn over a bright new leaf and determine to stick to our resolutions until the very end.

This snooping fem reporter had made a sensational discovery—a second Frank Sinatra is in the midst of the Hunt High school student body. Paul Hiromura, take a bow! When Paul “Sinatra” sings “All or Nothing At All,” he really knocks the girls for a loop. Maybe soon, the talent scouts will be looking for a second PAUL HIROMURA….Hey boys ever see SHIZ OCHIAI play basketball? She’s really spectacular! Watch her play sometimes, boys, and you’ll know we’re not “talking through our hats”….Ever since LOUIE KOZU got a k.d. to a certain Sophomore lassie he’s been walking “knee-deep in stardust”….TAK ISEFUKU, don’t try to squirm out of this one! You must know the miss that sits in the 4th row, 1st seat, 5th and 6th period Junior Core…..Hmm, you know, We’be [sic] been wondering long and hard why HIRO YONEYAMA always tramps up to Block 16-5-D. Ahem! Now we know, don’t we?…MARK HASEGAWA (sigh) is quite a guy, they tell me. (“they” meaning the fairer sex)….Lucky FRANK SASAKI has all the girls swooning over him since Arthur Murray taught him dancing (in a hurry?) via U.S. Mail….Our hats off to the Girls Club for presenting such an enjoyable assembly recently—How about another performance sometimes in the very near future?

Oh yes, girls! I nearly forgot to mention this, but it’s leap year again. Here’s hoping you ketch the right fella!! The year has just begun, So—let’s not cho-ku-chi.

Minidoka art show

Arts and crafts show at the Minidoka internment camp, circa 1943. Many of the Japanese American residents passed the time in camp by making furniture, artwork, and crafts out of found materials.

1945 Hunt High School yearbook page

Hunt High School was located at the Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho, where many Japanese Americans from the Pacific Northwest spent WWII. This yearbook page shows the Winter Mardi Gras Carnival Queen and Court from January 1945.

The Nisei often had unusual nicknames, and this class was no exception. A few of the nicknames from this page alone include Chiyoko “Onions” Murooka, Fudge Sakanashi, and Porky Noritake (bottom right photo).

1945 Hunt High School yearbook page

A few sports snapshots, featuring outdoor basketball and tumbling in the gymnasium. The yearbook notes that the gymnasium was unfinished and unable to host any basketball activities, but the students were able to reconstruct a hoop outdoors.

Minidoka woodblock print

Woodblock print made in the Minidoka internment camp by an art student of Fumi Haraguchi Kato at Hunt High School. This print depicts the iconic water tower at Minidoka.