Oregon Nikkei History

Sharing and preserving Japanese American history and culture

On this site we highlight photos from our historical collection housed at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center in Portland's Old Town neighborhood, as well as other information about history and Japanese Americans in Oregon. Please visit www.oregonnikkei.org to learn more about the Oregon Nikkei Endowment and its programs.
Posts tagged "US Army"

Camp Savage, Minnesota, circa 1944

Students of the Military Intelligence Service Language School at Camp Savage, where they studied the Japanese language and were later sent to serve in the War in the Pacific.

The MISLS was located at Camp Savage in Minnesota from 1942-44, after which it was moved to larger facilities at nearby Ft. Snelling.

Shoichi Endow (right) in the U.S. Army with two other Nisei soldiers during World War II. Sho joined the army prior to Pearl Harbor and eventually ended up in the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This photo may have been taken in Camp Shelby, Mississippi, circa 1944.

January 1945, Menton, France. Soldiers from the all-Nisei 442nd Regimental Combat Team determining coordinates for targeting mortars. Left to right: Okamoto, Lt. Teraoka, Akira “Ike” Iwasaki.

Pfc. Hideo Takahashi of “I” Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This photo was taken at Camp Roberts in California, sometime before Pearl Harbor. Hideo eventually went on to participate in the rescue of the Lost Battalion. Read more about Hideo Takahashi at Go for Broke.

Pfc. Hideo Takahashi of “I” Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team. This photo was taken at Camp Roberts in California, sometime before Pearl Harbor. Hideo eventually went on to participate in the rescue of the Lost Battalion.┬áRead more about Hideo Takahashi at Go for Broke.

Toshiaki Kuge with the liquor ration for the 100th Battalion officers, August 1945. The 100th was an all-Nisei unit in the US Army that eventually became attached to the Nisei regiment (442nd RCT).

Toshiaki Kuge with the liquor ration for the 100th Battalion officers, August 1945. The 100th was an all-Nisei unit in the US Army that eventually became attached to the Nisei regiment (442nd RCT).

Roy Maeda, 442nd RCT

Roy Maeda of “K” Company, 3rd Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Roy was born in Portland, Oregon, and served as a Master Sergeant during World War II. Along with rest of the 442nd, he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal this past fall for his service and accomplishments during the war. Roy passed away earlier this month in Oregon.

Members of the 442nd RCT Service Company. Jimmy Mizote of Oregon is on the left.

T-Bone Oka and other off-duty soldiers from the 442nd RCT playing baseball in France during World War II

John Murakami, 442nd Regimental Combat Team

The Nisei (second generation Japanese Americans) had their own segregated units during World War II, and the 442nd RCT became the most decorated unit of its size and length of service in U.S. military history.

John Murakami is shown here with a little girl in France.┬áJohn received a Bronze Star and Purple Heart for his service during World War II as part of “F” Company, 2nd Battalion.

Nisei soldiers and WACs, 1946

Captioned “Jim, Kisa, Lorry, Linda,” this photo was probably taken in 1946 in Washington, D.C. Lorry Nakatsu served in the Military Intelligence Service during World War II in the India-Burma Theater. After the war he was briefly assigned to Camp Ritchie in Maryland and then to a post in Washington, D.C., before he was discharged in July of 1946.

There were very few Nisei in the Women’s Army Corps, and this is one of the only photos we have showing Nisei WACs.

Ike Iwasaki, 442nd RCT

Taken in January 1945. Akira “Ike” Iwasaki is shown hauling 81-mm ammunition by mule to a forward position in Menton, France. Ike was a member of “D” Company (heavy weapons), 100th Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II. The 442nd RCT was a segregated unit in the US Army made up almost entirely of Japanese Americans.

Photo caption: “Left-Mule, right-Iwasaki”

Members of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Circa 1945.

The Nisei (second generation Japanese Americans) had their own segregated units during WWII, and the 442nd RCT became the most decorated unit, for its size and length of service, in U.S. military history.

Toshiaki Kuge, 442nd RCT

At the rear aid station, Mt. Altissimo, April 1945. Dr. Kuge was a member of the all-Nisei 44nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II.